Saturday, July 26, 2014

What Is A Cantilever?

"What is a cantilever? How can it open and close without wheels?" Were Norma's first questions.

We are having our annual patio party on Saturday so Brooks and the granddaughters came up a day early to install our cantilevered, rolling gate across the the driveway. Our yard is completely fenced but the twenty foot wide driveway was left without a permanent gate solution while everyone decided on the best way to do it. Brooks had this idea in mind right from the start and he finally won out. He was right all along.

He spent a full day welding the 46" high, thirty foot long steel, sliding gate together back in his workshop at home before loading it on his truck and bringing it up. In the meantime I ordered the four rollers from a fencing supply company in Ohio where they sold them for a fraction of their cost in Canada. Here, they are $200 each X 4 or $800 for the set. At Discount Fence Supply in Ohio they cost me $285 for all four, shipping included! This only works when you have two or three weeks lead time.

It took Brooks and I three hours to install the gate, including the wasted time for me to drive downtown to exchange the too short 6" carriage bolts for the required 7" version. The gate rolls back and forth on rollers behind the fence on top of the 7' high retaining wall, so it was not the most convenient or safest place to work but the job was completed with only one small cut on Brooks' hand.

The total cost for Phase I was about $700 for parts ($0 for labour). Phase II will be to add a chain drive to open and close the gate. Each car will have a remote control and there will also be a push button on the fence post. This might be done later this year but more likely next summer.

"Balance, drill, tighten bolts, repeat..."


 Norma, "Brooks, are you sure it is perfectly level? Don't forget to finish painting it". Brooks, "Yes mom".

The finished product! There are rows of fine stainless steel wire stretched horizontally to keep the deer from sneaking through the gaps.

10 comments:

  1. I'm trying not to laugh and failing. Norma's determined to win this war, isn't she?!

    The fence looks good, not too obtrusive, and doesn't block the view. Brooks does nice work!

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    1. She is determined to stop those deer, you have to say that for her.

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  2. The deer will figure it out. They'll probably jump over the gate. They like Norma's garden too much.

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    1. I can add a row or two of barb wire above the gate without interfering with the rollers. The road slopes down on the outside of the gate so it would be difficult for then to jump it. We will never outsmart them, we just want to slow them down for a while.

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  3. Nice project, good luck with the deer

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  4. Nice looking gate. I would be concerned about the deer being able to jump it though. It looks to be only about 4 feet high which I think most adult deer can clear from a standstill.

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    1. For some reason our deer do not jump much. Probably overfed on all the neighbors flowers. Plus, I can add a strand of barbed wire at the top if I have to.

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  5. Nice work with the welded steel rolling gate. Look forward to seeing it completely finished. Labour was a very good deal on this job.....!

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  6. That is one impressive looking, well-built fence. Good thing Norma was around to make sure it was installed properly.

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  7. Wow, hats off to you and Brooks for a job well done. That is a real gate. Coming to Mexico soon? We could use one like that!

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